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that republicans should whine about. he did win the election he's entitled to try this very liberal strategy and see if it succeeds for him and if it's the way to get his agenda through. i tend to have my doubts. we're all going to find out. >> brown: rev. hamilton, by your role you get involved in all the social issues of our time. did you hear the president making a kind of aggressionive statement about, "this is the way forward for all of us" or did you hear him reaching out to embrace people, to help create that? >> i think it's a great question. i wish he had done more to reach out. in fact that was the point of my message today at the national cathedral was to say, you know, we need a new american vision that's not just democratic or not just republican. it has to be a new vision that brings people together. if we had a new vision with key strategic goals that republicans and democrats have crafted together and say this is what we're going to work together over the next ten years, it would have a huge impact on bringing americans together. i wish that he had done more of that >> brown:
-than-expected showing in tuesday's elections. near-final totals showed his bloc and its allies had only 60 of 120 seats in parliament. netanyahu signaled he'll reach out to a new centrist party that made a strong showing. it favors a new focus on making peace with the palestinians. this was election day in jordan. voters cast ballots in the country's first parliamentary elections since the arab spring. the new legislature will have more power, including the ability to choose the next prime minister. some two million people were eligible to go to the polls. turnout estimates varied from a high of 56% to as low as 47% as the day went on. several islamist groups boycotted, saying the election was stacked against them. but the prime minister dismissed their actions. >> ( translated ): the weakness of the turnout, if it exists, and i am not saying that, nobody should think that it is because of the boycott. it is not correct. otherwise anyone would think if there was any hesitation for the elections it's because people were neither convinced with past elections nor with the performance of the past parliamen
and bus ride. and started selling tickets before election day >> there's nothing like being here. i mean i could watch it on television or i could sit in one of the buildings around here and probably look out at it. it's nothing like being in there. kind of like swimming. you can think about the swimming but if you're not in the pool you really can't feel it. >> suarez: for many we spoke to, it wasn't just history but this president that brought them to washington >> we don't think we've had a president like him before or will have one in my lifetime. so it's worth it to be here to pay homage to him and to his beautiful family and to the country that elected him and to the people who elected him. we're just delighted to be a part of this. >> this is history in the making. first of all from an historical perspective who wouldn't want to be here? but more importantly for me, the whole of the obama administration is everything that i hold dear >> suarez: margaret came up with her family from north carolina. for her a second inauguration for the first black president was no less exciting, no l
to be one of the least-effective in this cycle. you have people like tim kaine easily winning elections in the state like virginia taking on the n.r.a. and you have michael bloomberg spending money on this and defeating a-rated n.r.a. candidates. so the whole calculus has changed. it used to be the n.r.a. was the one game in town on the money front and the pac front. that's changed. so there's a real cost now for standing with the n.r.a. and i that is as you would say a game changer in that regard. >> brown: dr. gold, how does it change your world? the evolving politics here and events like newtown? >> well, it's -- you know, from my perspective-- and i'm not a gun expert, obviously-- but from my perspective it's really unfortunate that it takes these kinds of events to move forward with our country to make a stronger commitment to providing for mental health care needs of our citizens. it shouldn't have to take something like this for something to become a social priority. >> brown: but now that it's here, as you were saying before, there's still going to be many, many questions about
in washington, d.c. and the president-elect of the american academy of child and adolescent psychiatry. she has taught and published and barry rosenfeld is professor of psychology and director of clinical training at fordham university. he is a clinical forensic psychologist, whose recent work has focused on assessing the risk of violence in patients. i barry rosenfeld, i'd like to start right there. what's the problem that we need to understand in trying to determine in advance who might be capable of violence as we saw in new toub? >> well, the essence of the problem is that it's a needle in a stay stack. so we've got almost an infinite number of people-- i shouldn't say infinite-- a very large number of people who will fit any profile we might generate and we want to find the one person who's potentially going to be homicidal. there just isn't really a way statistically to identify or clinically to identify that person with any real accuracy. >> brown: dr. joshi, does that mean such limits we can't know what can be done? >> the issue, however, is that young children and adolescents who somet
food. i mean these are people who have mastered it. he was re-elected president of the united states with over a majority of the vote. with an economy that can only be described as suffering and troubled. so he understands the politics of it. he knows that it is an uphill fight. but the reality is and police officers will tell you as well, police chiefs in particular, is it is the impulsive end. and it's the idea of multideaths at a time which is what a gun can do. i mean it's not-- we have changed the culture in this country as as far as smoking has concerned. when i was a pfc, cigarettes were $2 a carton. now it's $9 for a pack of cigarettes and there is a stigma. we don't see smoking in movies any more. we don't see that same level of social acceptance. i mean i think the culture is part of it, no doubt about it. >> if i could just one on the politics, i think the ambitiousness of the proposals was politically savvy. because it will allow a lot of senators from marginal areas who are swinging in the mid thrill to say well i'm not for the assault weapons ban, that's too far. but i
million for the 2014 midterm elections. the n.r.a. is obviously, as you mentioned, going to be adding to their membership, getting more fund raising so this is a battle and a place where they can take out intense positions. >> sreenivasan: how about putting this in terms of perspective in terms of 2014, 2016? even the vice president why he decided to come out on good deal but is on almost a road tour. he seems to be campaigning for both gun rights and gun control or sun safety as well as maybe for himself. >> well, the presidential race, of course, we just inaugurated president obama for his second term. we've seen action shifts to the states. you have democratic governors making moves on this. andrew cuomo in new york is taking the lead. he could run for president. the vice president is not making it secret that he could be running for president as well so he's the front man on this major issue that the president will be talking about. so none of this is without politics in mind. the money does matter, the momentum on this matters when you're talking to different families affected by
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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